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Death investigation launched in South St. Paul after body found

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Police Chief Brian Wicke says the investigation has “some complexities” to it, and his department has asked the Minnesota BCA for help.

SOUTH ST PAUL, Minn. — Investigators are waiting on a medical examiner’s report as they conduct a death investigation in connection with a body discovered inside a home in South St. Paul. 

A Facebook post by the South St. Paul Police Department says squads responded to an address on the 300 block of 1st Ave. S. just after 6 p.m. on Wednesday, April 5 on reports of a person dead inside the residence. Responding officers found a man deceased from what police are calling “unknown causes.”

Police Chief Brian Wicke says agents from the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension (BCA) were called in to assist due to “some complexities” with the investigation. Wicke says the department is waiting on results from the Hennepin County Medical Examiner’s Office to determine the cause and manner of death. Those findings will determine the direction investigators take moving forward. 

“At this time, we do not believe there to be any threat or danger to the public associated with this death investigation and we will update should that information change,” read the Facebook post on the incident.  

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Met Council asks cities to sign-off on Blue Line Extension plans

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The Met Council is asking several cities to sign off on the preliminary design for the Blue Light Extension.

BROOKLYN PARK, Minn. — The communities along the proposed METRO Blue Line Extension are getting a chance to review and discuss the proposed plans with the public. 

The METRO Blue Line Extension is anticipated to be 13.4 miles between Target Field and Brooklyn Park, and would also run through Crystal and Robbinsdale. The Met Council hopes to start service in 2030, and estimate total ridership would be nearly 30,000 daily trips. 

Now, community leaders will be asked to consent to major project elements like where stations are located and where tracks will go. According to the Met Council, many project details haven’t been determined and the plans leave a lot of room for future design choices.

“This process gives people an opportunity to participate in the line through their elected officials,” said Met Council Chair Charlie Zelle in a press release. “This is a big investment that will serve our region for the next 100 years.”

Each of the municipalities will hold a public meeting and then vote before October 10, the Met Council said. 

“No matter how well we design a project, we need each city to let us know how it will fit into their neighborhoods and serve their communities,” said Zelle. “We’ve held weekly meetings for the past four years to ensure our designs are on the mark. But it’s up to each city council to approve preliminary design plans or recommend changes.”

The proposed plans can be viewed by clicking here.



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Delta finally reinstates flights for unaccompanied minors, after days of confusion and frustration

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An embargo on flights for minors flying solo had been in place since Saturday, leaving many families separated.

MINNEAPOLIS — There’s nothing minor about Delta’s multi-day meltdown, especially if you are a minor.

On Wednesday, Delta finally began resuming flights for kids 18 and under who are traveling alone, after pushing back an embargo of its unaccompanied minor program several times since last Friday.

“We just kept rescheduling and it just kept getting canceled,” said 13-year-old David Ikeda, who was supposed to fly home to Washington DC on Saturday after spending a few days visiting his grandparents and cousins in Minneapolis. 

“At least we’ve made the most of it,” said Cindy Ikeda, David’s grandma. “He got a haircut and he had plenty of extra cousin time.”

The five day delay has been considerably less fun for David’s parents.

“It would be nice to know when my son is going to get back here,” said John Ikeda, David’s dad.

John spent several hours over several days trying to rebook an unaccompanied minor flight home, but each time Delta pushed back it’s embargo on the program.

RELATED: CrowdStrike blames bug for letting bad data slip through, leading to global tech outage

“We didn’t even get great communication about what was happening,” John said. “We just kept getting these random emails saying they were pushing it back further and further.”

Allison Iacone said she didn’t even realize the embargo applied to her 16 year old daughter, Gigi, until she was trying to fly home from Baltimore to Duluth on Tuesday.

“(Gigi) checked herself in on her Delta app the night before. They accepted her check-in. She had no idea that the unaccompanied warning was going to apply to her because she doesn’t ever use any of those services,” Iacone said. “She didn’t find out that she couldn’t get on the plane until she arrived at the airport out in Baltimore.” 

The unaccompanied minor program typically applies to families who pay a fee to have escorts for children between the ages of 5-14.

Delta sent a statement to KARE 11 about the confusion on Wednesday:

“Delta embargoed minor and unaccompanied minor travel, beginning July 19, to protect minors from being separated from their families and caregivers in the event of flight disruptions or cancellations. We take seriously the trust caregivers place in us with their children’s travel, and sincerely apologize that that trust was compromised through confusion around the embargo. The embargo has been lifted, as of July 24.”

Despite that message, Allison showed KARE 11 messages she received from customer service agents who appeared to be unclear on whether older minors, like Gigi, were included in the embargo.

“The answer I kept getting was, ‘Well, she should be able to.’ Not, she will be able to, but she should be able to,” she said. “Which is not really what any parent wants to hear.”

Gigi did eventually find a flight home to Duluth and arrived on Wednesday night. But she received little more than apology for her extra night in Baltimore.

“Nothing, she asked, ‘Do you give vouchers for food? How do you handle that?'” Allison said. “And they just said, ‘Where are you going?’ She said, ‘I’m going back to my friend’s house.’ They said, ‘Yeah, we don’t give you anything for that. These kids should have been the ones who they had their eyes on rather than just turning them away and saying go home.”

Despite being a loyal Delta customer for decades, John says he’s never been more disappointed in an airline.

“I get that there were issues, but I would have expected that Delta would have prioritized unaccompanied minors,” he said.

John was so frustrated that he opted to book a different flight home for David, with American Airlines on Tuesday.

“We got to the gate, everything looked good,” Ikeda said. 

And then it was canceled right when they got to the gate.

“At least (David) can just come back out and hang with grandma and grandpa for another couple of days and see his cousins another time,” Ikeda said. 

Just one more major — or minor — inconvenience, depending on your perspective. 



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Picketers take over MPRB meeting

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The possible resolution was brought to the board by District 3 Commissioner Becky Alper, who made her plea before a packed room filled with striking workers.

MINNEAPOLIS — Picketers interrupted Wednesday’s Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board (MPRB) meeting after the board rejected a move to add a potential resolution to its agenda.

The resolution to pursue a prompt settlement was brought to the board by District 3 Commissioner Becky Alper, who made her plea before a packed room filled with striking workers.

“This is no longer a time to remain silent,” Alper said. “What you see before you is a path forward. To find a solution to this present conflict, which respects the gravity of the situation. It’s not about winning. This resolution isn’t pro-union or pro-MPRB management. If it had to choose a side, I would say it’s with the people.”

Commissioner Tom Olsen also supported the resolution, however, the motion to add it to the agenda was rejected.

The strike began on July 4 after LIUNA Local 363, the union representing more than 300 workers, rejected the board’s final offer. Since then, there have been multiple negotiation sessions, however, no deal has been reached. The union continues to press the board for a “fair” contract, saying some of their big concerns include union representation and professional advancement.

The MPRB has maintained that its offers have been “very fair,” saying that their offer on July 16 included a proposed 10.25% raise over three years, a $1.75 wage adjustment spread out over two years and contract language changes. 

It’s the latest chapter in what has been a contentious 20 days since since the beginning of the strike back on July 4. Last week, the MPRB filed an unfair labor practice charge after picketers allegedly “harassed and blocked” truck drivers from delivering to park-owned buildings.

The union filed the same charge against the MPRB on July 8 claiming the Board was using misinformation to undermine the workers.





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